DAVID FORBES

For me, “fine art” has become largely an elitist mystery permeated with pretentious language and, often, poor craftsmanship. I respond to images in a visceral way, and if a work doesn’t “speak” to me instantly, I move past it immediately.

I have been making images my entire life, as a child, at school, and began to make images seriously at university, where I taught myself 35mm photography and creative writing, including poetry. I became a journalist, a wordsmith and layout artist, but eventually discovered filmmaking in 1983.

With more than 40 years’ experience in making images in many mediums, I have recently been able to bring my drawing, imagination, experience and photography together to create images that I feel speak directly to our unique place in the world. I love the convergent strength of the technical and the creative.

My work is highly social and political. It speaks to aspects of society that people prefer to ignore, such as the betrayal of the struggle against apartheid, the authoritarian way the State deals with the People, and global imbalances and injustices forced upon us by economic and cultural imperialism and colonialism that is destroying our natural world.

Art is a fourfold reminder that we must never forget, we must never stop speaking Truth to Power, we must never stop creating, and we must never stop imagining. Our very future depends upon it.

For me, “fine art” has become largely an elitist mystery permeated with pretentious language and, often, poor craftsmanship. I respond to images in a visceral way, and if a work doesn’t “speak” to me instantly, I move past it immediately.

I have been making images my entire life, as a child, at school, and began to make images seriously at university, where I taught myself 35mm photography and creative writing, including poetry. I became a journalist, a wordsmith and layout artist, but eventually discovered filmmaking in 1983.

With more than 40 years’ experience in making images in many mediums, I have recently been able to bring my drawing, imagination, experience and photography together to create images that I feel speak directly to our unique place in the world. I love the convergent strength of the technical and the creative.

My work is highly social and political. It speaks to aspects of society that people prefer to ignore, such as the betrayal of the struggle against apartheid, the authoritarian way the State deals with the People, and global imbalances and injustices forced upon us by economic and cultural imperialism and colonialism that is destroying our natural world.

Art is a fourfold reminder that we must never forget, we must never stop speaking Truth to Power, we must never stop creating, and we must never stop imagining. Our very future depends upon it.